Bottle feeding your baby

Breastfeeding doesn’t always work, even if that’s what you want for your child. Sometimes the mother is unable to breastfeed due to medical reasons and sometimes she simply doesn’t want to.

Ingela Ågren

2 min read

Ingela Ågren

Bottle feeding your baby
Photo:Preggers

Not being able to breastfeed may lead to feelings of guilt, shame and sadness. It’s not uncommon for women to hear comments that are hurtful and thus amplify those feelings. The way you choose to feed your child has nothing to do with how good a parent you are. It’s more critical for the child that the mother is well, rather than that she breastfeeds, no matter what. Infant formulas are regulated to the baby’s needs and are an adequate nutritious alternative.

Feeding is the time when you can make yourself comfortable, cuddle your baby close to you and relax together. Even if you are not breastfeeding, the baby can still experience closeness, the touch of skin and the connection with the parent as the baby is held in your arms while being fed. Hold the baby on a slight incline in your arms, preferably skin-to-skin, and support the baby’s head and neck with your arm. Make yourself comfortable, have a pillow under your arm for support if you need to and ensure you don’t create tension in your body. Remember to swap sides next time you feed your baby. Let the baby find the teat, keep the bottle still and allow the baby to set the pace and decide how long to feed. Some babies take a rest and want to be burped during feeds, while other babies don’t. It is up to you to decide what bottle to use, but it is good if the hole in the teat is big enough not to slow down the feeding. Keep the bottle at an angle during the feeding to ensure that the teat is full of milk. Keep your baby in your arms for a while after feeding.

Ingela Ågren

Ingela Ågren