Exercising during pregnancy – Part 2

Things to avoid during pregnancy

Anna Reinhold Landaeus

2 min read

Reviewed by Anna Reinhold Landaeus

Lic PT, expertise in training during and after pregnancy

Exercising during pregnancy – Part 2
Photo: Preggers
  • Don’t lie on your back after week 20, due to the risk of Vena Cava Syndrome. The weight of the uterus puts pressure on the aorta and can cause low blood pressure and thus make you feel dizzy. Lay on your side instead.
  • Avoid vigorous jumping, running and lunges after week 20. The relaxin hormone is secreted during pregnancy to soften the joints and ligaments, meaning the body is not as stable as normal. This may lead to tripping and in the worst case injuries. The pelvic floor is also affected by relaxin (by softening it to ease the delivery of the baby). That’s why one should avoid high impact activities such as jumping, running and workouts with heavy weights above the head, which can cause intense pressure on the pelvic floor. This does not mean you should stop running completely, but instead modify your routine somewhat. Base your exercises on your own capacity and your own training regime and be aware of and consider the above risks. Jumping and running are not the best exercises during pregnancy.
  • Abdominal exercises such as sit-ups do not really deliver any benefits and can thus be avoided. During pregnancy, the growing tummy puts pressure on the bands of abdominal muscles and cause them to stretch and separate. Instead, focus on exercising the deep abdominal muscle tissues. Use your muscles to “hold the baby back against your spine” during lifts, exercises and other exertions.
  • Don’t take part in combat sports, scuba diving, climbing, downhill skiing, parachuting and certain ball sports.
Anna Reinhold Landaeus

Reviewed by Anna Reinhold Landaeus

Lic PT, expertise in training during and after pregnancy